Musings from the Moonroom

Thoughts on Art, Inspiration, Creativity and Spirit


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Anemia: An Art Doll Work in Progress

I’m often asked about my process for creating my art dolls. While the first step is sculpting the head, putting together the body varies. It mainly depends on whether the art doll will hang on the wall or stand freely. Then I have to decide what type of armature I will use for the art doll’s body. Will it be a hollow form, solid form, wire, cloth, or a combination.

In the video below, I share the process that I’m using for my most recent art doll, tentatively known as “Anemia.”

Enjoy!


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The Secret Knowledge of Water

Our friend Emile Tobenfeld, aka Dr. T, is one of several featured artists exhibiting work at The Nave Gallery’s “The Secret Knowledge of Water” in Somerville, MA. The opening reception was held last Friday, followed by a performance by Dr. T and the Immersions ensemble which included Eric, our friends Dean Stiglitz and Ramona Herboldsheimer, and Rick Scott. The video and music performance was aptly named “Water Music and other Improvisations.” To hear the performance, visit Jamendo.

Folks gathering in the gallery.


Several photographs in the “water” theme.


Mixed media, video, and photography.

Painting and photography.

More photography.

The Nave Gallery is part of the Clarendon Hill Presbyterian Church. Dr. T and the Immersions ensemble performed in the Sanctuary.

Loved this stained glass window.

Setting up for the show.

Eric plays synth and the Harpejji. Dean plays Electro Flute. Ramona plays Hammered Dulcimer. Rick also plays synth.


No show is complete without Gwynnie, Dean and Ramona’s dachshund.


Or the bees. Dean and Ramona sell organic honey. They were selling the honey at a farmer’s market before the show. And you do not leave your bees in the car.

Show time (sorry for the low light; I did not want to use a flash to take these pictures.)

The Secret Knowledge of Water exhibit runs through August 17. For more information visit ARTSomerville.


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Video Improvisations: Dr. T and the Impromptu 3

Eric had a gig Friday night at Gallery 119 in Lowell.  He played with two other musicians; Karen on augmented cello and Michael on bass and table guitar.  The three of them (Impromptu 3) were accompanied by Dr. T, who provided video mixing.

So what does that mean?

Dr. T (aka Emile Tobenfeld) mixes video images that he has compiled and projects them on a large screen while the musicians create music to compliment the images.  I consider it performance art that is truly spontaneous.  You’re not quite sure what images Dr. T will project on the screen, though he will give the musicians a general theme as a starting point.  From there they have to keep an eye on what is projected on the screen, develop and play music to match (or perhaps not) the images, and then also try to compliment what each other is playing.

Hence the names improvisation and impromptu (also because Dr. T often knows each musician, but they may not know each other.)

As I watched and listened to the performances I started to think about altered art work.  How the artist starts with an image or surface and then adds elements, removes elements, and transforms the piece until it feels complete.  Or perhaps round robin art events where individual pieces of art are passed amongst a group of artists, each person adding elements until the piece returns, transformed, to the original artist.

I also wondered what it would be like to make art to music.  I don’t mean working on art while listening to music but making an original piece of art influenced or inspired by a piece of music.  (For some reason Jackson Pollock paintings come to mind.)  You’re constrained by the type of music and the length of time the song plays.  But often out of constraint and limitation something wonderful emerges.

And so it was with the performances on Friday night.  A little constraint to begin with as the images appeared onscreen and one musician would begin to play a rhythm.  As more images appeared, changed, and repeated, the musicians joined in; each adding his or her signature to the piece.  The music would swell, dip, and sometimes become a little frenzied.  A range of emotions was sometimes evident. 

And then the improvisation, the pictures, the music, would quiet and come to a close.  And before the audience was a finished piece.

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