Musings from the Moonroom

Thoughts on Art, Inspiration, Creativity and Spirit

Solopreneur Wednesday: Who Said I Have To Be Passionate About My Work?

6 Comments

The topic of “follow your passion” or “being passionate” about what you do pops up every once in a while in the blogosphere. And in the past couple of weeks the topic has reared its head again.

I start to get a little, um, anxious, when this topic is discussed.

Near as I can tell this latest go-round started some time after the World Domination Summit was held in Oregon. Alyson Stanfield asked if this was good advice on the Deep Thought Thursday segment of her blog. The comments were entertaining to read.

Alyson attended WDS. Cal Newport was a speaker at WDS and he “debunked” the directive to “follow your passion.”  When Alyson said “yay” to Cal’s directive, that too generated many responses.

I did not attend WDS and did not hear Cal Newport’s presentation.

But when I read Alyson’s Deep Thought Thursday post and the accompanying comments, I couldn’t help but feel like there was something “wrong” with me. And I realized it has to do with the word “passion.”

Passion versus Making Meaning

This may be more about semantics than anything but when people talk about getting all “passionate” about what they do, I feel like an odd-ball. I start to doubt myself and ask “Am I really passionate about what I do?”

Something about that word conjures up images of people dedicating themselves to one thing for their entire lives, 24/7. They live, breathe, and eat whatever it is they are passionate about. I look at them and say “Wow. Wish I was like that.”

But I don’t think I am. At least not compared to the image that is in my head.

Now don’t get me wrong. I love what I do. But I also like to do other things. I love making my art. I love looking at art. I also love to travel, cook, spend quiet time with my hubby, play with the cats, take long walks, and so on and so forth.

I have many interests and some may rank higher than others at any given time. And I think that is where the whole “passion” thing bothers me.

It seems to conjure up this idea that to be passionate about something means that is the only thing you could be passionate about. That just doesn’t feel right to me. When I’m making my art, I’m focused and enjoying that moment. When I’m traveling, I’m enjoying that moment. When I’m eating a great meal, I’m enjoying that moment.

Instead of being passionate about something, I think I prefer to feel that what I’m doing is meaningful or that I’m at least getting something out of the experience.

And in terms of making art, this has been a biggie for me.

I’ve always had a strong desire to make meaning with my art. This is part of the reason why I got bored with production work. I couldn’t find much meaning in repetitively making wine bottle stoppers, perfume pens, or business card cases.

So I made my Spirit Messengers. These pieces held meaning through symbolism and stories. And I saw how people reacted to them when I brought them to art shows.

Darwin Explores
Amy A. Crawley (2012)

Over time I decided to focus on animal inspired art. It made sense as animals are of great interest to me. I care about their welfare. I donate a portion of sales from my art to a local no-kill animal shelter. But, as I said, it took some time to make this subject matter the focus of my art.

I think the other aspect that makes the “follow your passion” mantra difficult for me is that this art making gig is also my business. Somewhere along the way, when art becomes a business, you learn there are many more things that must be considered if you hope to have some amount of success. It becomes a balancing act to make art and run a business as an artist.

Maybe that’s why some people say “Beware of your hobby turning into business” (or something like that.)

This morning I read Alyson’s most recent blog post on why she doesn’t advise people to follow their passion. She wrote this as a follow-up to her Deep Thought Thursday post, as many people wanted to know her opinion on the discussion.

I really agree with Alyson’s opinion. What do you think?

6 thoughts on “Solopreneur Wednesday: Who Said I Have To Be Passionate About My Work?

  1. I would not say that I am passionate about my art. I am more like addicted to it. If I don’t have a pencil in my hand I go into withdrawal. Well maybe not that bad. But I know what you are saying. If I am not making something. I am thinking about making something. So I think in my case it is an addiction. Oh well. better than drugs or alcohol.

  2. Great post, Amy, and Alyson’s too. They both really spoke to me about my experience in trying to “follow my passion” when I started selling my jewelry back in the 90s. Alyson’s first point about how something deep inside changes when you start to ask for money about something you’re passionate about. Bingo! That was totally my experience. And now that I no longer pursue the selling side of it, I can enjoy, not pursue, my passion – the creation part (and, like you, it’s only one of my many passions) without it changing how I feel about it. In my job, I am passionate about tea but am not passionate (shhh, don’t tell anyone) about the taking orders, managing, etc. part of it. Thanks for sharing, it was very insightful.

    • Passion for what you do and making it a business is definitely a balancing act Karen. I’ve learned that if I enjoy what I’m making, I’m completely comfortably getting paid for the art “end-product.” I’m also okay with changing my focus and being open to what I truly enjoy to do. Alyson’s blog post really resonated with me. So nice to have someone finally say “It’s okay not be ‘passionate’ about I do.” That it doesn’t make me an odd-ball.

  3. I’m really starting to wonder about it all. I took my passion for writing, photography, spirituality and helping others and turned it into a business. Now it’s starting to feel like work and I’m not sure that I feel as passionate as I did at the beginning. I know it’s to be expected but at the moment my head is spinning with too much input from others!

    • Loran, I think turning your passion into a business can be compared to a long-term relationship. Excitement in the beginning, frustration in the middle, and then a blissful comfort as you now know each other quite well. Lots of input can indeed be overwhelming. I’ve learned that it is completely okay to acknowledge someone’s suggestion, perhaps write it down in the “business parking lot” and then let it go if it doesn’t resonate.

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